MnWE

A Minnesota Conference on Writing and English

MnWE 2019: North Hennepin Community College (Friday, April 5-Saturday, April 6)

MnWE Conference Home

MnWE is “Minnesota Writing and English,” a consortium of Upper Midwest college and university writing and English faculty and staff centered in Minnesota. Our annual two-day conference each spring attracts up to 200 attendees, and we send the bi-monthly “MnWE News” by email to about 1500 members in Minnesota and surrounding states and one province. Click here to see the most recent “MnWE News.”

*

MnWE 2019: Connecting Reading and Writing

North Hennepin Community College
Brooklyn Park, Minnesota (Twin Cities)
Easy-Access Driving and Free Parking – Click Here for Hotel Information.

Friday-Saturday, April 5-6
Plenaries: 9 am. Keynotes and Lunch: 11:30 am
Breakouts and Workshops: All of Fri.-Sat.
MnWE Dinners: Fri. and Sat. Evenings – RSVP Here (Appreciated, not required)


Friday Lunch Keynoters:
 Author and Minneapolis Community and Technical College Teaching Professor Shannon Gibney; and Associate Professor of Library and Information Science at St. Catherine University Sarah Park Dahlen.
(See 2019 Keynotes and Plenaries.)

Saturday Lunch Keynoters: Shirley Johnson and Linda Russell, two top experts and educators in College Reading in Minnesota Public Colleges. (See 2019 Keynotes and Plenaries.)

MnWE’s 2019 theme, “Connecting Reading and Writing,” encourages sharing perspectives about the links between engaging with written texts and producing writing. Please join us at North Hennepin Community College in the northwest corner of the Twin Cities metro area on Friday-Saturday, April 5-6, to help us give each other community, practical pedagogy, and scholarly thought about this theme and about other general issues related to Writing, English, and Reading.

Reading and writing are the cornerstones of English, writing, and literacy education. Whether we ask students to examine fiction or non-fiction, we usually ask them to read a “text,” broadly defined, and then respond. As post-secondary instructors and high school teachers, we often take for granted that our students know how to read but not how to write. What happens when we overtly teach them to read a variety of texts? How would we integrate more reading instruction into our writing courses?

We have a high number of presenters for you this time, and many of them will be discussing with you–and engaging you in–the connections between reading and writing. The subjects range from textbook reading to reading literature and creative writing, and how these activities connect with our own pedagogies and our students’ writings. Presenters are joining us from throughout Minnesota, from several nearby states, and from as far away as New York. Join us for the continuing conversation!